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30 Best Critical Thinking Podcasts

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  • The Peter Attia Drive
  • Critical Thinking with Andrew Coppens
  • Critical Q&A
  • Cognitive Dissonance
  • Global Development Institute Podcast
  • On Life. W/ Jamie Sinclair.
  • Don't Be All Like, Uncool: A Very Bravo Podcast
  • Paris Institute for Critical Thinking
  • Chasing Elephants Podcast
  • Critical thinking, critical issues
  • The Reality Check
  • Thinking Commercially
  • Re: thinking education
  • Jamie Clubb's Podcast
  • Are You Just Watching? | Christian movie reviews with critical thinking
  • Squaring the Strange
  • Inquiring Minds
  • Ex-Jehovah's Witnesses-Critical Thinkers » Critical Thought Podcast
  • Throttle Up Radio with Captain Kevin Smith
  • Thinking Clearly
  • Critical Thinking Required
  • Desert Voices: Spiritual Conversations
  • The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast
  • The Talk of Shame
  • HIS REVIVAL
  • Barely Gettin' By
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Critical Thinking Podcasters

  • Critical Thinking Podcasts Newsletter

Critical Thinking Podcasts

Here are 30 Best Critical Thinking Podcasts worth listening to in 2023

1. The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

2. Critical Thinking with Andrew Coppens

Critical Thinking with Andrew Coppens

3. Critical Q&A

Critical Q&A

4. Cognitive Dissonance

Cognitive Dissonance

5. Global Development Institute Podcast

Global Development Institute Podcast

6. On Life. W/ Jamie Sinclair.

On Life. W/ Jamie Sinclair.

7. Don't Be All Like, Uncool: A Very Bravo Podcast

Don't Be All Like, Uncool: A Very Bravo Podcast

8. Paris Institute for Critical Thinking

Paris Institute for Critical Thinking

9. Chasing Elephants Podcast

Chasing Elephants Podcast

10. Critical thinking, critical issues

Critical thinking, critical issues

11. The Reality Check

The Reality Check

12. Thinking Commercially

Thinking Commercially

13. Re: thinking education

Re: thinking education

14. Jamie Clubb's Podcast

Jamie Clubb's Podcast

15. Are You Just Watching? | Christian movie reviews with critical thinking

Are You Just Watching? | Christian movie reviews with critical thinking

16. Squaring the Strange

Squaring the Strange

17. Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

18. Ex-Jehovah's Witnesses-Critical Thinkers » Critical Thought Podcast

Ex-Jehovah's Witnesses-Critical Thinkers » Critical Thought Podcast

19. Throttle Up Radio with Captain Kevin Smith

Throttle Up Radio with Captain Kevin Smith

20. Thinking Clearly

Thinking Clearly

21. Critical Thinking Required

Critical Thinking Required

22. Desert Voices: Spiritual Conversations

Desert Voices: Spiritual Conversations

23. The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast

24. The Talk of Shame

The Talk of Shame

25. HIS REVIVAL

HIS REVIVAL

26. Barely Gettin' By

Barely Gettin' By

27. Mentally Unscripted

Mentally Unscripted

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Best Critical Thinking Podcasts

Best Critical Thinking Podcast

With the modern age and the increasing use of a passive mode of communication more and more people are struggling to get their point of view across clearly and concisely. There is no longer the need for messages and conversations to be short and to the point. Instead, many of us choose to use long, rambling phrases in an attempt to clearly explain what we want to say.

However, this is certainly not the best method. Because if you can say something clearly in ten words why would you use twenty? But, communicating in this way is a skill. It can be learned, but it will take time and practice. This is called critical thinking. This article highlights 7 Best Critical Thinking Podcasts.

What is critical thinking?

Critical thinking is a thinking process that takes facts, situations and judgements and mediates them through your mind to provide a rational and clear conclusion. This can be applied to almost any situation, allowing you to apply the process to all aspects of your life. Your relationships, emotions and presentation skills can all be improved with critical thinking.

So, how can you learn this skill? Well, one of the best and easiest ways to pick this up is through podcasts. You can listen and learn on the go, at your own pace. You can also choose from a variety of different approaches to the topic, allowing you to find one that best suits you.

Here we will list the best critical thinking podcasts out there.

Thinking Clearly

The Thinking Clearly podcast covers a broad span of topics but focuses on the issue of false information. In a world of “fake news” how are we supposed to know what to believe and what not to believe? Well, this is where critical thinking can come into play. It helps you to understand and analyse all of the information presented to you before making a decision.

It will provide you with “self-defense” techniques to protect yourself from believing and spreading false information. This way you can keep yourself up to date with what is going on in the world without the fear that it may be a lie.

Data Skeptic

Data skeptic is a podcast that covers critical thinking from a scientific point of view. The need to think rationally and analytically in the scientific field is of the utmost importance. After all, false scientific claims and rules can bring about some very grave and serious consequences.

The podcast is very engaging with various discussions and interviews. The different approaches to critical thinking within the various spheres of the scientific field allow you to understand the importance of critical thinking. It demonstrates how it applies to everything from medicine to artificial intelligence.

Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques

This podcast is given by Matt Abrahams, a strategic communication lecturer and graduate from the Stanford business school. So, you can rest assured that you are in good hands. He covers critical thinking from a business point of view, demonstrating how the skills involved in critical thinking are vital to the workplace.

He covers everything that arises in the workplace that can be aided by critical thinking such as writing emails, presenting to colleagues and even talking to the boss. By tackling critical thinking from this angle many people can reap the benefits of being able to think and analyze logically and clearly, applying the techniques to their everyday life.

Inquiring Minds

Another podcast that is great for science fans. But instead of tackling the issues and advantages of critical thinking in a purely scientific field, Inquiring Minds focuses on the point of contact between scientists and wider society. The issue of rapidly developing medical process and social media and “fake news” can be a tricky one to navigate.

Often, false information spreads like wildfire and can actually be horribly detrimental to public health, even if it started out as an obvious joke. This is where critical thinking can come into play and be a useful and powerful tool. It removes the “sheep” mentality, allowing people to think for themselves, judging the data and information that they are presented with fairly and accordingly.

Critical Thinking, Critical Issues

Led by Rupert Watson, who is the head of asset allocation at Mercer Investments , this podcast demonstrates how to use critical thinking within the world of investing. Debates between the host and guests make for an exciting listen, as various viewpoints and arguments are clearly made and discussed.

This podcast covers everything from investment opportunities to market themes and emerging ideas.

The Skeptic’s Guide

The Skeptic’s Guide is another science-based critical thinking podcast, but this time it is a little easier to understand for the everyday man as it covers bad science and conspiracies. The broad appeal of discussing conspiracies means that the podcast is wonderfully engaging and entertaining, all while teaching you how to assess the beliefs for yourself.

This can then be applied to all the other various areas of your life, as you learn to debunk and reconsider beliefs that may be unfounded and just take as a given at face value.

The Overwhelmed Brain

This podcast is a great option if you are looking to use critical thinking for a much more personal aim. The Overwhelmed Brain helps people with low self-esteem, anxiety or depression. It teaches you to take back control of your emotions by critical thinking. This allows you to assess and analyze your emotions in relation to the situation and relationships, building your confidence in the process.

Critical thinking is a fantastic tool that can be applied to all areas of life. No matter your lifestyle, interests or concerns rest assured that there is a critical thinking podcast out there for you.

Even if one of these best critical thinking podcasts does not correlate exactly to you the skill is transferrable so you can still apply the skill that you have learnt to your own life even if you are just listening about people debunking conspiracy theories!

The Overwhelmed Brain – Start Here!

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Helen Lee Bouygues, founder of the Reboot Foundation, believes that a lack of critical thinking is responsible for many business failures. She says organizational leaders often...

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Helen Lee Bouygues, founder of the Reboot Foundation, believes that a lack of critical thinking is responsible for many business failures. She says organizational leaders often rely too heavily on expertise and then jump to conclusions. Instead, leaders should deliberately approach each problem and devote time thinking through possible solutions. The good news, she says, is that critical thinking skills can developed and practiced over time. Bouygues is the author of the HBR.org article “ 3 Simple Habits to Improve Your Critical Thinking .”

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Teaching in Higher Ed

Rethinking Critical Thinking

With mays imad.

| April 21, 2022 | Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Email

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Mays Imad shares how she (and others) is rethinking cricital thinking on episode 410 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Thinking has an affective component.

It was so important for me to make my own decisions and come to my own conclusions. -Mays Imad

Thinking has an affective component. -Mays Imad

Our rational thinking can be hijacked when we are under the influence of fear. -Mays Imad

  • What would Socrates think? by Mays Imad 

Intellectual Empathy: Critical Thinking for Social Justice by Maureen Linker

  • Five Essential Ways of Knowing, by Ben Harley and Mays Imad for Inside Higher Ed
  • Rumi quote: “You are not a drop in the ocean. You are the entire ocean in a drop.”
  • Susannah McGowan
  • Sam Wineburg

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On this episode.

Mays Imad Square

Mays Imad is a neuroscientist, a science educator, an educational developer, and a mental health advocate. She is a Gardner Institute Fellow and an AAC&U Senior Fellow. Dr. Imad’s current research focuses on stress, self-awareness and regulation, advocacy, and classroom community, and how these relate to cognition, metacognition, and, ultimately, student learning and success. She is also interested in better understanding the various dimensions of critical thinking, including the role of feelings in short circuiting or enhancing critical thinking. Through her teaching and research, she seeks to provide her students with transformative opportunities that are grounded in the aesthetics of learning, truth-seeking, justice, and self-realization.

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  • Bonni Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak is the producer and host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, which has been airing weekly since June of 2014. Bonni is the Dean of Teaching and Learning at Vanguard University of Southern California. She’s also a full Professor of Business and Management. She’s been teaching in-person, blended, and online courses throughout her entire career in higher education. Bonni and her husband, Dave, are parents to two curious kids, who regularly shape their perspectives on teaching and learning.

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[00:00:00] Bonni Stachowiak: Today on episode number 410 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Mays Imad is back, and she is Rethinking Critical Thinking.

[00:00:12] Production Credit: Produced by Innovate Learning, maximizing human potential.

[00:00:21] Bonni: Welcome to this episode of Teaching in Higher Ed . I’m Bonni Stachowiak and this is the space where we explore the art and science of being more effective at facilitating learning. We also share ways to improve our productivity approaches, so we can have more peace in our lives and be even more present for our students.

Mays Imad received her undergraduate training from the University of Michigan Dearborn, where she studied philosophy. She received her doctoral degree in cellular and clinical neurobiology from Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Michigan. She then completed a National Institute of Health-Funded Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Arizona in the Department of Neuroscience. She joined the Department of Life and Physical Sciences at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona, as an adjunct faculty member in 2009, and later as a full-time faculty member in 2013.

During her tenure at Pima, she taught physiology, pathophysiology, genetics, biotechnology, and biomedical ethics. She also founded Pima’s Teaching and Learning Center. Imad is currently teaching in the biology department at Connecticut College. Mays is a Gartner Institute Fellow and an AAC&U Senior Fellow within the Office of Undergraduate STEM Education.

Dr. Imad’s research focuses on stress, self-awareness, advocacy, and classroom community, and how these impact student learning and success. Through her teaching and research, she seeks to provide her students with transformative opportunities that are grounded in the aesthetics of learning, truth-seeking, justice, and self-realization. Mays, welcome back to Teaching in Higher Ed .

[00:02:36] Mays Imad: Thank you. Thank you for having me.

[00:02:38] Bonni: We’re going all the way back together today. We’re going to go back to your childhood. Could you describe yourself as a child to us? What were you like?

[00:02:48] Mays: I was very introspective. In fact, recently, I was reading some teacher’s comments from grade school from first grade and it describes me just really so specifically that I needed time to sit alone and think and then ask questions and go back and sit alone and think. I don’t think I was an introvert, but I definitely was very much theories and abstract and just very introspective.

My paternal grandfather was an intellectual, so I would ask him big questions. I learned what excited him. I’d ask him about history, and I think he really instilled in me this love of asking questions and learning through questions and finding home in those questions if you will.

[00:03:52] Bonni: There was something that you worried about a lot as a child as part of this thinking process. What did you worry a lot about?

[00:03:59] Mays: I was terrified of being manipulated. I think in part because I knew I experienced whether it was on the playground or at the dinner table, myself, switching my mind or getting persuaded when I didn’t want to or manipulated. I knew how easy that can happen and I was terrified of it happening to me and losing my autonomy. It was so important for me to make my own decision to arrive at my own conclusion. While I couldn’t articulate why it had something to do with– well, I now know, with just living life to the fullest.

[00:04:54] Bonni: As we fast forward a little bit in your life, could you take us to a very important turning point in your life, and that was the year of 1993?

[00:05:04] Mays: Yes. That’s the year that my mother and sisters, we emigrated. We escaped Iraq. We had to leave, my sisters were ill. This was after the 1991 Desert Storm. Iraq went from being developed country to an increasingly undeveloped country. There was an embargo and life was just very difficult for your average citizen. It was difficult. It was difficult to leave your school, to leave your friends and family, and all of the uncertainty.

As a teenager, it was really, I remember pain. While we were crossing the borders between Iraq and Jordan, there were issues. We were caught that we were trying to leave the country and my mom was taken away. I remember she turned to me and she said, “Take care of your sisters.” I had two sisters with me in the taxi, the stranger, taxi driver. I do remember both being angry that I can’t believe I’m doing this and I had no say and at the same time, just terrified.

Somehow I kept thinking, I just need to finish my school. It became like a soothing lullaby, I just need to finish my school. Somehow, if I finished my school and got my education, I knew that I would be okay. Whatever happened, whether my mom came back or not, I would be able to take care of myself and my sisters. My mom came back, we were able to leave, and we made it to Jordan. Then we made it to the States. I think back about that story and what led to that realization that if I got my education, that it was so intimately linked to being okay.

[00:07:20] Bonni: That to me seems quite an unusual source of comfort. Do you also find it unusual source of comfort or is that my own cultural background? Perhaps speaking here, do you see that as something that would be a common way, when someone faced with that kind of a situation, to see it as such a comfort?

[00:07:40] Mays: Yes. That’s a great question. I’m not sure. I know for me, it’s always been a source of comfort. I wonder if it’s because maybe the tradition that I grew up in, or my grandma reciting poetry and teachings of sages about, for example, Rumi says, “You’re not a drop in the ocean. You’re the entire ocean in a drop.” It’s this, sometimes as a child, or even as an adult, I got glimpses of what that means and I find it enormously comforting. It makes the world less lonely, in an existential sense, if you will.

When I look back, and the hardship that I’ve been through as an immigrant, just as a human, I always found comfort in education, and even healing and understanding, and still to this day. Then, I think, when I speak with students and they share similar experiences that reaffirms my experience, I think, “Well, maybe it’s maybe it is a common thing that we have.”

[00:09:05] Bonni: Something I know that you find to be missing or lacking in education today is critical thinking. I know from what little bit I know about critical thinking, when we say that phrase or that word, we mean a lot of different things by it. Before we really talk about what that means, would you share when you remember noticing that it wasn’t there? What kinds of circumstances would you find yourself in where you would think, “Well, they know this, but they don’t possess critical thinking?” Maybe that’s even in you. Did you notice it first in you or did you notice it first in learners?

[00:09:47] Mays: I did notice it in me I think towards the end of my graduate or even postdoctoral years. My undergraduate training was in philosophy. It was all critical thinking, it was all just Socratic questioning and logic and just critical thinking. Then I went and I got my PhD in clinical neuroscience, and then I did my postdoc and it was this ultra-focused very disciplined, strict approach to understanding the world. I understand why that is, and yet I was noticing that I was becoming, I don’t know, less cerebral, less critical, less creative towards the end of my postdoc. That’s in part because I was so focused on that one gene that I was studying.

Fast forward several years later, I’m in the classroom and I was teaching a variety of classes, science classes, and one class in particular that I began to ask myself more and more questions about critical thinking was biomedical ethics. Biomedical ethics is a class that both science and non-science major students took it. It requires that we do argumentations and learning about deductive and inductive reasoning and learning about fallacies. There’s a lot of debate if you will. We write arguments, we refute arguments, and so on.

That’s when I began to notice in students’ writings, including students who had had me in previous courses and did really well in anatomy and physiology and genetics, they were really struggling with the argument part or the constructing or deconstructing arguments, the premise, the conclusion, assumptions, and so on. Then I started just collecting data to see if it’s just an anecdote, if it’s my perhaps some bias or if it’s actually there. What the data showed, this is from several courses, is that indeed students were struggling with the part of the course that dealt with logic and critical thinking, and fallacies.

In fact, students would say, this was the toughest part of the course. Students would say, “How come this is the first time we’re learning it?” I thought, is it? Then I look at the science curricula or I look at high school curriculum and it is, we don’t teach a course on logic. We don’t teach a course, that’s exclusively on critical thinking. Then I did another study where I asked STEM students, “Do you want to learn this?” Overwhelmingly, over 90% said, yes. Right now, we’re not learning it in a systematic, intentional way. Some went on and said, “This is hurting us in the real world.” They linked it to misinformation and linked it to just– some would even link it to our democracy and how it’s all interconnected.

[00:13:29] Bonni: When you asked them, “Do you want to learn this?” How did you ask this? Was this something that they had already learned and so you asked them, is this something you’d want to learn more about, or did they already have a conception of whatever came to mind when they thought about argumentation and logical fallacies, et cetera?

[00:13:50] Mays: I did two things. With students that were taking my courses, at the end of the course, there is a course evaluation. I added a question about, “Do you think is merit to teaching critical thinking and logic in STEM courses and if so, why?” Then separately, I did a survey where I asked STEM students at the college, at Pima Community College, if they think it is important to include critical thinking and logic in introductory STEM courses. In both cases, students came back and said, “Yes, please, we want this. Help.”

[00:14:35] Bonni: What can you tell us about what is missing from even those of us that may introduce some of these things in our classes, as far as the inner landscape of critical thinking? What can you tell us about that?

[00:14:49] Mays: Thank you for asking. When I presented some of this work at The Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research, SABER, there was a lot of interest. One of the recurrent questions that I got from my colleagues is, “How do we do this?” What I did is I and some colleagues, Suzannah McGowan, for example, we wrote an NSF grant, it’s an incubator grant, and we got the grant. We gathered together a group of science educators. What we wanted to do is we wanted to create–

First of all, decide on definitions. What is critical thinking? How do we teach it? What is logical thinking reasoning, and how do we teach it? We wanted to also come up with examples, sample assignments, and to really spend time on all right, we have those sample assignments, we have definitions, how do we assess it? We did about a year of work with that incubator grant. We created a website. We put everything on that website.

Now, in the process of doing research with my students and also doing the work with that incubator grant, there were two things that emerged. Number one, critical thinking is not enough. If I was seeing that students learned the logical fallacies and learned the structure of an argument and how to assess it and analyze it, and yet they were getting stuck when they encountered something that was ambiguous that dealt with uncertainty, or definitely they were getting stuck when they were dealing with a topic that had some ideological or political implication.

That came out from the research. In addition, we did some consulting with Sam Wineburg, who’s done a lot on misinformation. Sam and others are of the opinion that it’s not just critical thinking that we need to be able to tell if something is real or fake, and then we also did some work with Maureen Linker who taught logic and critical thinking and philosophy at the University of Michigan Dearborn, who’s written a book on intellectual empathy for social justice.

She and others, and the science of learning tell us that thinking has an effective component. That feelings are an important part of the problem-solving or thinking process. The whole inner landscape then is a call for us to broaden what we think and what we conceive of critical thinking. The American Philosophical Association now really confines the definition of critical thinking to logic and these cognitive and rational processes, but we know that those processes don’t happen without the affective, the emotional component.

Then what does it mean to have a framework that engages with the feelings also? The reason it’s important is oftentimes I tell my students and my colleagues and myself is that our rational thinking can be hijacked when we are under the influence of fear but if I learn to be able to recognize those strong emotions, the feelings, and work with them, then rather than getting hijacked and impacting sometimes in a negative way, my thinking process, they can even inform it. The inner landscape becomes a quest for understanding the relationship between critical thinking and the critical feeling, but also the critical engagement.

[00:19:29] Bonni: Something that really helped me understand this, as I read your work, was an assignment that you gave to students about imagining a world devoid of critical thinking. Could you talk about that assignment and what they came up with? This was just fascinating for me.

[00:19:46] Mays: As it was for me. I learned from students that if I teach them the fallacies, they’d become really good at it. They become really good at just constructing arguments, deconstruct, they’re really good but what I felt was missing is the personal connection to why this is important. This is not just a game and an exercise. I wanted to see if they were making the connections to our survivability, just our democracy, our humanity. That’s what I talk about in the paper. It’s really important to interrogate, with our students, the utility of critical thinking.

I created this assignment where I say, “Describe, imagine a society that lacks critical thinking. What might that society look like and why?” Then there’s another part, is a reflection on their reflection. It was really incredible what came back and what came back actually led me to believe that no, the students actually are really engaged in critical thinking. In fact, we all are in a day-to-day and what we need is perhaps more emphasis on it and more discussion about it.

What came back is this without me preparing them, without me even giving them any hint, but this link to our ability to live together, our ability to thrive, some students talked about empathy. Some students talked about justice, some students linked it to the demise of society and democracy, and so on. They were able to see, at least, the students that I worked with, the connection between this class, this assignment, these fallacies that we were learning, and the future and their role in that future.

[00:22:03] Bonni: Before we get to the recommendation segment of the podcast, I’d love to have you share a little bit about what you are seeing as the difference between really teaching something, or perhaps I should phrase it a different way, really getting to experience people, learning something versus introducing concepts or ideas, or asking people to memorize things. What are some distinctions that you’re noticing between those two things?

[00:22:32] Mays: That’s a great question, not just with critical thinking, with any topic and what I’m seeing with students, comments, and their reflections is students want to really fit and marinate with those topics and concepts. They don’t want to be presented, to be given a list, memorize it and go on. They’ve already made the connections that this is important in the real world if you will.

In fact, I was just analyzing some of the qualitative data from one of the studies I did on critical thinking and what comes back, again and again, is students want this to be infused in all of their courses across curriculum, and to be able to practice more and more. One of the students, whom I was reading their input, said that it actually helps reduce their imposter syndrome. The more they practice the skills, the more it becomes second nature, the more they freeze when they are confronted with new situations.

I remember in my classes, the classes that left an impact on me that remember to this day, years later, those are the ones where there was a lot of reinforcement and a lot of integration and making connections, not just with each other, but the materials. I mentioned Dr. Maureen Linker. I remember she was my professor and she was remarkable. Even the stories that she told about her family, about her upbringing. She used those stories to help us practice some of those critical thinking or logic, symbolic logic tools we were using in the classroom. She understood though remarkably so, the affective component of learning.

[00:24:47] Bonni: Something that I’ve been thinking about with regard to this is, and I do think we have to be cautious about this, but I have a colleague who’s responsible for a class that our first-year students take and she’s finding that she gets better information when she asks them their second year about that class and the value of it than if she asks them at the end of that first semester in college. Again, I think we have to be careful not to just say, “Well, it doesn’t matter.” I think that initial feedback, I still believe is important yet. Also thinking about it a little bit longer.

To that end, I’m teaching a class right now where I use some modules built by Mike Cofield about information literacy. I had a young man just tell me yesterday, say, “I just don’t think I’m going to use this.” It didn’t make me that afraid because I have noticed that he has a little bit of a pattern of his initial response to things is to push it back a little bit. I’m seeing but I’m thinking, “I want to talk to you in four weeks” because we’ve just left that and now I have some assignments. The acronym that Mike Cofield uses is SIFT. I called the assignments SIFT in the wild and they’re going to be able to go read about any of the topics that they find particularly of interest that relate to the course and then apply it.

I think that it’s possible that there’s hope for this young man that I’m not going to give up, but because we don’t do that in a lot of our classes, they’re so used to, “Well, I’m just evaluating this because now this module over we’re going on to something else,” and they’re used to this past fail grade for whether or not any of this is going to be beneficial to them.

Then I know this is another thing that you have written about and researched about too because, to me, it’s the context in which these skills are going to be used. To me, unless students are able to have both the agency to explore context that may be more relevant or important to them in their own lives. Anyway, this is something that you were getting me thinking about.

[00:27:11] Mays: I’m so glad you mentioned that. It reminds me of– I always would say, “Why should you worry about this? Why should you invest energy in this? What does this have to do with your Sunday brunch with your family?” I always do that in my classes. I remember a student who finished bioethics with me and she went through the module and critical thinking and logical reasoning and so on.

She come to visit me maybe a year later or so. She said, “I love critical thinking.” I said, “Oh yes, say more.” She said, “Every time I would argue with my husband, I end up crying and I get too emotional.” The other day, they had an argument. That’s what she said. “Then in the middle of the argument, I said, “Well, that’s a fallacy.” She said, “Dr. Imad,” and it shifted the whole argument. “I wasn’t crying. I was like, “Oh, I caught a fallacy.” To hear this student just feel so empowered by her own brilliance and reason and critical thinking was really remarkable. It’s an everyday process. It shows up, it can empower us. It can help us. It can illuminate our path forward.

[00:28:38] Bonni: The Sunday Brunch. [laughs] Well, this is the time in the show where we each get to share our recommendations. Today, I’d like to share about a movie that one of our kids has been looking forward to pretty much since she first heard about it, it is the new Pixar movie. It is called Turning Red , and it is an absolute delight. It’s funny, it’s charming.

It’s about a 13-year-old girl who struggles with some changes that are happening, including that she keeps turning into a red Panda. I’m not giving much away because you definitely see that in the previews. It’s just a really fun, delightful movie and something I would seriously suggest for the whole family. It’s great to bring out all kinds of conversations and to help us think about how we navigate our emotions. That’s my recommendation for today. Mays, I’m going to pass it over to you for yours.

[00:29:40] Mays: Thank you. I love your recommendations. I recommend either the book or the show Station Eleven , and it’s a post-apocalyptic show story about the power of art and creativity in helping us endure trauma and change and uncertainty, and it’s beautiful. I loved it so much that I couldn’t finish it. I wasn’t ready to part ways with it.

[00:30:11] Bonni: Oh.

[00:30:12] Mays: I recommend that. For our music lovers, I recommend Mustafa the Poet who is a Somali Canadian beautiful artist. He released a recent album and it is heartbreaking and heartwarming, it’s a tribute to his friend Ali. What else? To learn more about this, I would recommend, Maureen Linker’s book, Intellectual Empathy: for Social Justice .

[00:30:50] Bonni: Such great recommendations. I’m so glad to get to have this follow-up conversation with you. Thank you so much for introducing me to this wide array of reading and research that feel so new and fresh to me and so important. I’m so glad to be a small part of. Hopefully getting to have other people be introduced to it as well. I hope people will check out the show notes because there’s a lot of great resources there as well as the recommendations too. Thank you for coming back on Teaching in Higher Ed .

[00:31:18] Mays: Thank you so much and thank you for this beautiful work that you do.

[00:31:24] Bonni: Thanks once again to Mays Imad for joining me for today’s episode of Teaching in Higher Ed .

If you’d like to see the show notes for today’s episode, head on over to teachinginhighered.com/410. If you would like to not have to remember to do that every time, I invite you to sign up for the weekly update. You can do that by going to teachinginhighered.com/subscribe. Once a week, you will receive from me an email that has the most recent podcast guest, other related episodes, some recommendations that are beyond what shows up in the episodes, quotable words, and a little preview of the following week’s episode. Again, I encourage you to head over to teachinginhighered.com/subscribe. Thanks for listening, and I’ll see you next time.

[00:32:26] [END OF AUDIO]

The transcript of this episode has been made possible through a financial contribution by the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE). ACUE is on a mission to ensure student success through quality instruction. In partnership with institutions of higher education nationwide, ACUE supports and credentials faculty members in the use of evidence-based teaching practices that drive student engagement, retention, and learning. 

Teaching in Higher Ed transcripts are created using a combination of an automated transcription service and human beings. This text likely will not represent the precise, word-for-word conversation that was had. The accuracy of the transcripts will vary. The authoritative record of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcasts is contained in the audio file.

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 The ThinkCritical Podcast produces interviews, roundtables, and biweekly episodes on public policy and critical thinking topics.

114 episodes

The Revolution will be streamed LIVE! Comedians Ty Barnett and Ian Harris are "Critical AND Thinking" Two politically active, socially conscious and ethically responsible comedians who use humor and critical thinking skills to push the national conversation forward, promoting science, reason, justice and empathy. Progressive, passionate, funny, sometimes edgy, and always on point. With a wide range of guests an topics covering politics, comedy, science and maybe even a little MMA!

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The fellas welcome David C Smalley to the show to talk about the recent Joe Rogan controversy including his vaxx stance and his usage of the n-word.

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Episode 51: Hacker Stats 2023 & 2024 Goals

Episode 51: In this episode of Critical Thinking - Bug Bounty Podcast, Justin and Joel are back for the last episode of 2023. We discuss some noteworthy news items including a Hacker One Crit, Caido updates, and some Blind CS...

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Hacker Stats 2023 & 2024 Goals (Ep. 51)

December 28, 2023

Hacker Stats 2023 & 2024 Goals (Ep. 51)

Episode 51: In this episode of Critical Thinking - Bug Bounty Podcast, Justin and Joel are back for the last episode of 2023. We discuss some noteworthy news items including a Hacker One Crit, Caido updates, and some Blind CSS. Then we dive into our own personal ‘Hackers Wrapped’ recap of the year, before laying out some goals for 2024. Follow us on twitter at: @ctbbpodcast We're new to this podcasting thing, so feel free to send us any feedback here: [email protected] Shoutout

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Mathias "Fall in a well" Karlsson - Bug Bounty Prophet (Ep. 50)

Episode 50: In this episode of Critical Thinking - Bug Bounty Podcast, Justin catches up with hacking master Mathias Karlsson, and talks about burnout, collaboration, and the importance of specialization. Then we dive into the technical details of MXSS and XSLT, character encoding, and give some predictions of what Bug Bounty might look like in the future… Follow us on twitter at: @ctbbpodcast Send us any feedback here: [email protected] Shoutout to YTCracker for the awesome int

Getting Live Hacking Event Invites & Bug Bounty Collab with Nagli (Ep. 49)

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Getting Live Hacking Event Invites & Bug Bounty Collab with Nagli (Ep. 49)

Episode 49: In this episode of Critical Thinking - Bug Bounty Podcast, Justin Gardner is once again joined by Nagli to discuss some of their recent hacking discoveries. They talk about finding and exploiting a backup file in an ASP.NET app, discovering vulnerabilities through Swagger files, and debating the vulnerability of a specific ‘undisclosed’ domain. Then they reflect on 2023’s Live Hacking Event circuit, and preview what’s to come in 2024’s. This episode sponsored by Wordfence! Wordfence

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Episode 48: In this episode, joined by the spectacular Sam Erb, Google Security Engineer and DEFCON Black Badge winner. We talk about the importance of understanding how systems work to find vulnerabilities, and how his engineering background influences his hunting style and methodologies. Then we jump over to his Career Development and his work with Google, and then chat about some of the recent Google Vulnerability Programs. This episode is sponsored by Wordfence! Wordfence recently launched

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Episode 46: In this episode of Critical Thinking - Bug Bounty Podcast, Justin is deep diving the topic of SAML (Security Assertion Markup Language), and walks through what it is and why it can be intimidating, before going over some key attack vectors to look for. Then he closes out with a commentary on a sample payload, and some HackerOne reports. Follow us on twitter at: @ctbbpodcast We're new to this podcasting thing, so feel free to send us any feedback here: [email protected]

About the Hosts

Justin Gardner (@rhynorater)Profile Photo

Justin Gardner (@rhynorater)

Full-time Bug Bounty Hunter

Justin is a full-time bug bounty hunter and top-ranked live hacking event competitor. He has taken home two Most Valuable Hacker awards and countless other 1st place & 2nd place trophies.

While Justin specializes in web hacking, he also dabbles in IoT and mobile hacking. He is also the HackerOne Ambassador for the Eastern US region.

Outside of hacking, Justin enjoys Volleyball, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and Real Estate investing.

Joel Margolis (@0xteknogeek)Profile Photo

Joel Margolis (@0xteknogeek)

AppSec @ Match Group

Joel is a appsec engineer at Match Group (the parent company of Tinder, Hinge, Plenty of Fish, OkCupid, Archer, and other dating apps). Joel is also a top bug bounty hunter and has participated and received awards in 30+ live hacking events.

Joel also has experience running a bug bounty program from his time with Uber and Tinder, so he understands the program side as well.

Outside of hacking, Joel enjoys hanging playing Jazz music, playing with his dog, Max, and tinkering with his home automation system.

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